Author: MobLab Team

"How Big is Yours?" campaign empowers 665,000 people to protect Mediterranean fisheries (Case Study)

Case Studies

Oceans without fish – a potential reality when young fish are overharvested. This is the story of how a campaign to end overfishing implemented innovative strategies to reach millions of unlikely supporters, turn citizens into activists, and change public policy to protect three threatened fish species. The “How Big is Yours?” Story Our Impact Images and Video Takeaways Many integrated channels. It’s often necessary to use many communications channels to reach new people. Humor. Done right, humor can help connect to new and larger audiences. Adaptability & Experimentation. Celebrity sex videos, crowdsourced ad funding, virtual pet fish: the campaign was...

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Conversations on tap at Digital Mobilisation Skillshare

Events

Greenpeace’s first Digital Mobilisation Skillshare will kick off later this month. (on 26 Feb). Dozens of you around the globe have given time and insights to help put together an engagement-driven draft session slate. We took a look at some session ideas a few days ago. How are big organizing events of the past several months (think Arab Spring, Keystone XL, Occupy) are affecting mobilisation campaigns? How do we build digital capacity? Skillshare participants also hope to hear from one another about campaign strategies and tactics. Given the global context of Greenpeace work, campaigners are involved in a huge...

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A mobilisation strategy for Greenpeace? Meeting recap (video).

Insights

Last week, a number of us already working on mass mobilisation at Greenpeace came together to look at how our various projects and programs fit together and how it could add up to a global strategy for Executive Directors to review at their next meeting (the “EDM”). The video below is our attempt at summarizing that conversation. We looked at mobilisation as it relates to all phases of communications, digital campaigning, volunteer coordination and our values-driven segmentation that strives to have us thinking about people’s needs, not just Greenpeace’s. Mobilisation in the future, as Pascal Husting spoke about recently, means working alongside people. My favorite part is Brian Fitzgerald talking about how “it’s a bit odd to be talking about mobilisation as if it’s a new thing in the organization, because we’ve actually done mobilisation all through our history.” He goes on to name a few great examples of people powered campaigns. My second favorite part? The rally taking place in the background! Looks like our friend Rui had some fun in the editing room… 😉 I know that the group who met is looking forward to engaging more people around the globe in the conversation that began. We’ll share more details here about ways to plug in just as soon as we know what those opportunities...

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Campaigning with People: Pascal Husting, Greenpeace Intern'l Programme Director, on mass mobilisation

Insights

What does mobilisation mean now, in the midst of Occupy, the Arab Spring and other current events? How has mobilisation at Greenpeace changed compared to 40 years ago when Greenpeace started or even compared to just a decade ago? What role will the digital realm play in campaigns from now on? These are some of the questions we recently covered in a visit with Pascal Husting, the new International Programme Director at Greenpeace, to discuss the future of campaigns and how digital mobilisation is affecting Greenpeace. Pascal was most recently the Executive Director of Greenpeace France. Video of the conversation is...

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Creative Volunteers Run Networks to Engage Citizens in Policy Change

Case Studies, People Lead

Part of the challenge facing digital campaigners at Greenpeace and other organizations is creating and supporting opportunities for individuals to engage more deeply with campaigns. In many organizations, you have just two options outside of donating money: one click to sign a petition, or invest in days or weeks of training to become a trusted, skilled volunteer. But increasingly we’re seeing Greenpeace organizations collaborating more with supporters and even asking supporters to assume more ownership for campaigns. In an effort to uncover, document and share these innovative mobilisation strategies within the global Greenpeace network, we’ve partnered with the Engage Network, a leader in grassroots engagement, to interview Greenpeace volunteer coordinators and leaders around the world about their innovative mobilisation projects. Meet Alexander van Sehlen of Germany. Alexander led a volunteer group for four years before joining the staff of Greenpeace Germany. This group helped craft a network of seven groups that ran an anti-nuclear campaign across the country. Volunteers painted yellow tins with signs pointing to Chernobyl and left them in cities to raise public awareness that the dangers of nuclear power are everywhere. The series of events culminated in the seven groups coming together to stage a mock nuclear plant explosion. The value of this project is, in part, increased public awareness of nuclear power dangers. But there’s much more to learn in how it was done and what...

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